Puppy Culture DVD
Wells Providence Great Pyrenees
Wells Providence Great Pyrenees
Wells Providence Great Pyrenees
Wells Providence Great Pyrenees
Wells Providence Great Pyrenees
Wells Providence Great Pyrenees

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Wells Providence Great Pyrenees
Wells Providence Great Pyrenees


Great Pyrenees

The Gentle Giants

Our Great Pyrenees guard our livestock and property as well as being loyal pets. We breed for quality, temperament, livestock guardian ability and companionship. Our puppies are whelped and raised in our home until 3-4 weeks of age. They are then acclimated to the outdoors. Since they are raised in our home, all of our puppies are well socialized.  All puppies will be exposed to livestock training with Mom and Dad and will be accustomed to the sites, sounds and smells of a farm. All puppies come with current vaccines and de-worming before going to their new homes. A follow up visit to a Veterinarian is mandatory to complete the remaining puppy vaccines and begin a heartworm preventative.  

We only place our puppies in responsible homes. We offer a five year health guarantee and, to keep them out of shelters and rescue, we will always take back a puppy if for any reason the Buyer can no longer care for the puppy. Adding a Great Pyrenees to your family is a long term, serious commitment, so please do not take it lightly.
  We insist that you read our Evaluating A Breeder page before you buy, no matter who you purchase from.


So, do you want a working Livestock Guardian dog or a Family Guardian?  Is there really a difference?


About The Breed: Great Pyrenees are known as the “Gentle Giants”. They are very confident, gentle (especially with children) and affectionate. While territorial and protective of its flock or family when necessary, its general demeanor is of composure, patience and loyalty. They are a loyal guard dog that demonstrates a possessive attitude towards family, property, and livestock. Although bred to have a kinder personality, the breed still excels with predator control around the home.


Description: The Great Pyrenees dog conveys the distinct impression of elegance and unsurpassed beauty combined with great overall size and majesty. He has a white or principally white coat that may contain markings of badger, gray, or varying shades of tan. He possesses a keen intelligence and a kindly, while regal, expression. Exhibiting a unique elegance of bearing and movement, his soundness and coordination show unmistakably the purpose for which he has been bred, the strenuous work of guarding the flocks in all kinds of weather on the steep mountain slopes of the Pyrenees.Great Pyrenees have double dewclaws on their rear feet (you should trim them regularly as they do not wear down). The dewclaws are functional appendages that are attached to bone and should not be removed. The double dews are believed to have given the Pyr's more traction and grip when climbing the Pyrenees Mountains.  Many breeders want to sell Great Pyrenees puppies that have "big, blocky heads" or "short muzzles". Please see the Breed Standard as Judges will disqualify a Pyr that does not conform to the Breed Standard. This website will provide you with an illustration of the Breed Standard: http://gpcaonline.org/jeillustrated.htm


Height:  25 - 32 inches. 


Weight:  90-120 lbs. 



Here is a GREAT website that gives an excellent tutorial on how to evaluate a Pyr:  http://www.grendslori.com/evaluatingapyr.htm



Is a Great Pyrenees the dog for you? 

You've seen these big, beautiful white dogs. You're impressed, naturally. You think you want one. This is understandable. But is this the breed for you? They are not the ideal pet for everyone!


The mature, sedate Great Pyrenees which you have seen did not just materialize suddenly. It grew from a cuddly, lovable ball of fluff which at 8-12 weeks of age is most captivating. From puppyhood to adulthood is a great distance and a considerable time. As a breed they are remarkably healthy and long-lived. They have few major genetic problems and usually live to be 10–12 years old.


Pyrs combine a great intelligence with a deep devotion to family and home, and a natural-born instinct to guard and protect. While trustworthy, affectionate, gentle and tractable, they can become, when and if the need arises, protective guardians of their family and their territory. Thus, they command respect as watch dogs as well as admiration as pets.


Adult Pyrs are placid by nature and calm in the house, enjoying quiet periods in which to rest and sleep. But they are a large breed and as such are not always suited to life in a small apartment or urban setting with little yard space and lots of activity around. They want their life to be consistent and predictable.


The addition of a dog to your family is a major decision and deserves a great deal of time and thought. A Great Pyrenees is placid by nature, so despite their size, they are excellent house dogs. Yes, an adult Pyr is a beautiful, calm dog, but there are other considerations — have you thought of these?


Considerations

Are you physically able to handle a very large dog? Basically gentle, they are strong, and during the phases of puppyhood can be a real challenge.


Does dog hair around the house bother you? If so, forget the Pyrenees. While with routine grooming they are not much different than any other breed, they do shed and there are white hairs in Pyr homes and on Pyr people.


A Pyr needs love and attention on a daily basis. Are you and your family able to provide this? A lonesome Pyr is a bored dog, and a bored dog can become destructive.


Great Pyrenees are, at heart, guard dogs and members of the great family of Livestock Guardian Dogs. Their basic personality is different from most breeds, since most breeds were bred to take commands from people, while Pyrs were bred to work on their own. Like all livestock guardian breeds, Pyrs are barkers, especially at night. That's what they are bred to do. Your neighbors might find this behavior distasteful so Great Pyrenees in urban or suburban settings must be kept indoors at night.


A Great Pyrenees is an intelligent, sometimes willful animal. They have minds of their own and are not easily obedience-trained. Things that you consider important may not be the same things your Pyrenees considers important. Many are almost cat-like, in their independence.  If you require a dog who will be a great "off-leash" companion for your outdoor activities, if you want a dog who will follow your every command, or if you want a competition obedience dog, the Pyrenees is probably not for you.


Do you have room for a Pyr? They are large and must be confined in a well-fenced area, or they will exercise their powerful instinct to establish and patrol a large territory. When out of the fence they must be kept on lead at all times.


The Great Pyrenees requires a well-fenced area that will prevent him from roaming and attempting to enlarge his territory. If you don’t keep a Great Pyrenees in a properly fenced yard, sooner or later he will exercise his powerful instinct to establish and patrol a large territory and will run off, or get stolen, we promise you that. Pyrs are a guard dog by instinct, not by training. No matter how expert your dog-training skills, you will not be able to “teach” a Pyr not to patrol a large territory, any more than a Retriever can be trained not to retrieve, or a Border Collie not to herd. It is essential to have a fenced yard as this breed of dog will roam and not many neighbors appreciate a big strange dog sniffing around their property, children or other animals.


The Great Pyrenees is a guard dog and as such cannot be expected to welcome uninvited intrusions onto your property. They will accept anyone whom you invite into your home. They are not "attack" dogs, but can be very intimidating to the surprised visitor. It is an owner's obligation to maintain a Great Pyrenees so that his guarding instincts can be exercised in a responsible way.

Resources: GPCA  http://www.gpcaonline.org


Another great site to read BEFORE deciding on a Pyr: 

http://www.great-pyrenees.us/great_pyrenees_right_dog_for_you.htm



Did you know?  Experts state you should NEVER buy a puppy from an ALL WHITE litter:

Although many breeders know breeding all white to all white can result in  Pyrs that are smaller in size, weak or missing pigmentation and recessive alleles becoming dominant resulting in a genetic train-wreck, they will still breed an all white male to an all white female to obtain a litter consisting of ALL SOLID WHITE puppies.  One must ask: Knowing the genetic implications, why would a person intentionally breed "all white to all white"?  Sadly, they do this because they know "All White Sells".  They know buyers have a preference for Big, Solid White, dogs  and, in order to meet that market demand, they will breed all white to all white to sell puppies irregardless of the genetic implications associated with such a breeding.  Litters should consist of a mixture of badgered puppies and all white puppies.  If the litter consists of ALL solid white puppies, RUN, DON'T WALK!  More information can be found: http://gpcaonline.org/jeillustrated.htm



Another great site regarding the all white to all white breeding is noted on the Highlands Kennel page

They have been a great mentor for our breeding program.